Monki, with support from Mental Health Europe, present: All the feels. A campaign created to raise awareness about the positive and negative effects of social media on our mental health.

How does social media make you feel?

Have you ever scrolled through your feed and felt like everyone else’s life is much MUCH more interesting than yours? Felt like you weren’t pretty enough, fun enough, smart enough, or just enough? If you breathe, think and own a smart phone, the answer is probably yes. 

There’s a lot more to life (and to being a human) than what fits into a filtered social media profile. A single day can be a wild roller-coaster ride of emotions, and that’s just impossible to show in a single selfie. Social media makes us laugh and cry. It makes us feel lonely and it makes us feel loved.

It’s time to acknowledge all those feelings.
It’s time to love them. ALL of them.

Meet the ambassadors

Meet our three ambassadors that we worked with in this campaign. They all have gone through personal struggles and mental health issues and have a strong social media presence that you can follow for inspiration and pepp.

Elyse Fox

In December 2016 filmmaker Elyse Fox released “Conversations with Friends” a short personal documentary in which she, for the first time, opened up about her depression. It was an instant success. A wave of young women reached out to her after seeing the film – looking for a mentor and a place to talk about mental health issues.

That need laid the foundation for Elyse’s next project: Sad Girls Club, a community that gives women a safe place to talk and share stories about their mental health journey. The the goal is to break the stigma surrounding mental health issues by sharing stories.

“Social media is a bad idea when it begins
effecting your mental health negatively.”

Elyse’s top three tips
on how 
to handle
social media anxiety:

 

1.
Take a break/detox!

2.
Mute pages that don’t
make you feel your best
(muting is less harsh
than blocking someone)

3.
Create a finsta [fake insta]
account and allow access
to a small group of people
you love, use this space
to be your true self!

John Yuyi

John Yuyi turns social media into art, and uses the creative process as a way to work through her anxiety. Her temporary tattoos take some of the most popular online platforms and turns them into IRL beauty marks. With the internet as one of Yuyi’s biggest inspirations it’s not surprising that her Instagram account has more than 142 k followers.

With a background in design Yuyi flourishes in the intersection between fashion and art – making her an industry darling. With her ground-breaking approach to social media she is quickly becoming one of her generations most progressive and innovative artists.

“I feel like I’m John Yuyi’s agent, manager, assistant. She’s a fictional character that I have to build and run.”

Yuyi’s top three tips
on how 
to handle
social media anxiety:

 

1.
Leave it there, don’t post,
don’t watch, just leave it there.

2.
Sing karaoke. Dance a little.
Exercise a little. Shout a little.

3.
Hang out with your best friend
somewhere in nature.

Emily Bador

Emily Bador has been dubbed the “Body-positive Instagram Queen”, and rightly so. She uses her platform to challenge the fashion industry’s lack of diversity and unrealistic beauty standards. In 2016 she decided to take some time off from modelling. She needed time to work on the unhealthy practises she picked up due to the pressure of the industry, time to work on self-love. Now her Instagram account is a place of empowerment, diversity and an honest document of her journey back to modelling – whilst putting pressure on the industry to change.

“Social media has been both a blessing and a curse in the way that I view my body image.

Emily’s top three tips
on how 
to handle
social media anxiety:

 

1.
Turn off your notifications!
You don’t need to see those
likes as they pop up.
(You can leave your DM
notifications on separately!)

2.
Unfollow or mute anyone who makes
you feel bad about yourself.
Keep your feed full of positivity
and
people who educate and boost you.

3.
If you feel yourself becoming
obsessive, try setting a timer.
I give myself 25 mins to
do all my socials. When the
times up I have to do something
else for a few hours before
I check it again!

“Community is a huge part of social media”

Elyse Fox

The next time you scroll through your fav social media platform and start doubting your own amazingness, know that you’re not alone.

We all have good days and bad days. We all feel like warriors and worriers. We’re in this together.

And if all else fails: Stop. Breathe. And put the phone down.

MHE

 

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Mental Health Europe

 

Mental health and social media anxiety are highly personal subjects – no experience is the same. We want to handle this topic sensitively and correctly, so we choose to work together with people who know a lot more about this than we do.

Mental Health Europe is a non-governmental organization that works like a network group within Europe. They’re committed to the promotion of positive health and work closely with their large network to end mental health stigma. They provide contacts for anyone who needs more help.

Youth helplines
https://mhe-sme.org/youth-helplines/

Local organisations
https://mhe-sme.org/ours-members/#MeettheMembers

Monki, with support from Mental Health Europe, present: All the feels. A campaign created to raise awareness about the positive and negative effects of social media on our mental health.

How does social media make you feel?

Have you ever scrolled through your feed and felt like everyone else’s life is much MUCH more interesting than yours? Felt like you weren’t pretty enough, fun enough, smart enough, or just enough? If you breathe, think and own a smart phone, the answer is probably yes. 

There’s a lot more to life (and to being a human) than what fits into a filtered social media profile. A single day can be a wild roller-coaster ride of emotions, and that’s just impossible to show in a single selfie. Social media makes us laugh and cry. It makes us feel lonely and it makes us feel loved.

It’s time to acknowledge all those feelings.
It’s time to love them. ALL of them.

Meet the ambassadors

Meet our three ambassadors that we worked with in this campaign. They all have gone through personal struggles and mental health issues and have a strong social media presence that you can follow for inspiration and pepp.

Elyse Fox

In December 2016 filmmaker Elyse Fox released “Conversations with Friends” a short personal documentary in which she, for the first time, opened up about her depression. It was an instant success. A wave of young women reached out to her after seeing the film – looking for a mentor and a place to talk about mental health issues.

That need laid the foundation for Elyse’s next project: Sad Girls Club, a community that gives women a safe place to talk and share stories about their mental health journey. The the goal is to break the stigma surrounding mental health issues by sharing stories.

“Social media is a bad idea when it begins
effecting your mental health negatively.”

Elyse’s top three tips on how to handle social media anxiety:


 1.
Take a break/detox!

2.
Mute pages that don’t
make you feel your best
(muting is less harsh
than blocking someone)

3.
Create a finsta [fake insta]
account and allow access
to a small group of people
you love, use this space
to be your true self!

John Yuyi

John Yuyi turns social media into art, and uses the creative process as a way to work through her anxiety. Her temporary tattoos take some of the most popular online platforms and turns them into IRL beauty marks. With the internet as one of Yuyi’s biggest inspirations it’s not surprising that her Instagram account has more than 142 k followers.

With a background in design Yuyi flourishes in the intersection between fashion and art – making her an industry darling. With her ground-breaking approach to social media she is quickly becoming one of her generations most progressive and innovative artists.

“I feel like I’m John Yuyi’s agent, manager, assistant. She’s a fictional character that I have to build and run.”

Yuyi’s top three tips on how to handle social media anxiety: 


1.
Leave it there, don’t post,
don’t watch, just leave it there.

2.
Sing karaoke. Dance a little.
Exercise a little. Shout a little.

3.
Hang out with your best friend
somewhere in nature.

Emily Bador

Emily Bador has been dubbed the “Body-positive Instagram Queen”, and rightly so. She uses her platform to challenge the fashion industry’s lack of diversity and unrealistic beauty standards. In 2016 she decided to take some time off from modelling. She needed time to work on the unhealthy practises she picked up due to the pressure of the industry, time to work on self-love. Now her Instagram account is a place of empowerment, diversity and an honest document of her journey back to modelling – whilst putting pressure on the industry to change.

“Social media has been both a blessing and a curse in the way that I view my body image.

Emily’s top three tips on how to handle social media anxiety: 


1.
Turn off your notifications!
You don’t need to see those
likes as they pop up.
(You can leave your DM
notifications on separately!)

2.
Unfollow or mute anyone who makes
you feel bad about yourself.
Keep your feed full of positivity
and
people who educate and boost you.

3.
If you feel yourself becoming
obsessive, try setting a timer.
I give myself 25 mins to
do all my socials. When the
times up I have to do something
else for a few hours before
I check it again!

“Community is a huge part of social media”

Elyse Fox

The next time you scroll through your fav social media platform and start doubting your own amazingness, know that you’re not alone.

We all have good days and bad days. We all feel like warriors and worriers. We’re in this together.

And if all else fails: Stop. Breathe. And put the phone down.

MHE


IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Mental Health Europe


Mental health and social media anxiety are highly personal subjects – no experience is the same. We want to handle this topic sensitively and correctly, so we choose to work together with people who know a lot more about this than we do.

Mental Health Europe is a non-governmental organization that works like a network group within Europe. They’re committed to the promotion of positive health and work closely with their large network to end mental health stigma. They provide contacts for anyone who needs more help.

Youth helplines
https://mhe-sme.org/youth-helplines/

Local organisations
https://mhe-sme.org/ours-members/#MeettheMembers