Are we there yet?

Life moves in circles, fashion should too.

This November, Monki is proud to introduce the Green Machine. A machine that, for the first time, can fully separate and recycle cotton and polyester blends at scale.

Most of the clothes we wear today are made of blends of different fibres, and the most common one is cotton and polyester blends. The Green Machine uses a hydrothermal method to separate these blends – using a closed loop of only water, heat and biodegradable green chemicals.

 

So, how does it work?

  1. Place a polyester and cotton blend textile into the Green Machine.
  2. The fibres are separated using only heat, water and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals.
  3. A large oven is used to dry-out the separated fibres.
  4. The result: separated polyester fibres ready to be used to create a new garment – and the cotton is extracted as powder, which can be used in multiple ways.

*It’s a closed loop! The water, heat and biodegradable green chemicals are used again and again – which means it generates no secondary pollution.

 

Monki has created the brand’s first collection using the Green Machine system. The online exclusive grey tracksuit set features the statement, respect your mother (nature), embroidered on the hoodie and trackpants. While this is a smaller scale production at the moment, the brand aims to roll out the process on a larger scale by autumn 2021.

Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki

“As a fashion brand we need to do our part when it comes to closing the loop. With eyes wide open Monki will walk into this climate-decade and be part of the solution.” Says Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki, “If we can prolong the life of our products for as long as possible and decrease usage of virgin sources, it’s a huge step in the right direction.”

 

The facts

The majority of the clothes we wear and produce today are made of cotton and polyester blend fabrics, and there is no commercial method available that can fully recycle these garments into new ones. Until now.

What: The Green Machine (hydrothermal technology).

Why: Time to change the game for textile recycling at scale.

Where: The collection was made together with Monki and one of the brand’s key suppliers in Indonesia.

How: The machine separates blend textiles by using only heat, water and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals. See below for the full step-by-step process.

Who: In 2016, the H&M Foundation partnered up with the Hong Kong Research Institute of Textiles and Apparel (HKRITA), with a common goal to accelerate research on textile recycling. The goal was to find a commercial method that could recycle blend textiles at scale Only one year later, the researchers found a way to use a hydrothermal method to recycle blend textiles without any quality loss – and the Green Machine was born. Monki is the first brand to create and distribute garments from the Green Machine.

 

 

Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki

“Imagine a world where fashion brands implemented impactful and meaningful strategies through innovative design and production – and importantly, invite their community to be part of the journey, to re-use and recycle garments.” Says Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki, “This is one milestone and key puzzle piece that we’re actively working on. We have big plans and are positively overwhelmed by the success of this partnership thus far.”

Erik Bang, Innovation Lead at H&M Foundation

“As a non-profit foundation we invest our resources in solving the most meaningful challenges around us. We act as catalysts for change and to achieve real impact we need solutions to be adopted and scaled by industry and citizens. That is why this collection is a milestone beyond just clothing, it is a meaningful milestone for the benefit of the planet, right here and now.” Says Erik Bang, Innovation Lead at H&M Foundation, “Next, we’re building a plant and will give this technology away for anyone to use. That is how we can exponentially accelerate the change needed to reach the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.”

 

Edwin Keh, CEO of HKRITA

"We are very excited to be able to scale the hydrothermal separation system with Monki, finally we have gone from concept to trials to products." Says Edwin Keh, CEO of HKRITA. "By making yarns, fibres, and apparel with the "Green Machine" we want to demonstrate that while fashion cycles maybe fast, the materials we use to make our clothes can last a long time."

Are we there yet?

Life moves in circles, fashion should too.

This November, Monki is proud to introduce the Green Machine. A machine that, for the first time, can fully separate and recycle cotton and polyester blends at scale.

Most of the clothes we wear today are made of blends of different fibres, and the most common one is cotton and polyester blends. The Green Machine uses a hydrothermal method to separate these blends – using a closed loop of only water, heat and biodegradable green chemicals.

 

So, how does it work?

  1. Place a polyester and cotton blend textile into the Green Machine.
  2. The fibres are separated using only heat, water and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals.
  3. A large oven is used to dry-out the separated fibres.
  4. The result: separated polyester fibres ready to be used to create a new garment – and the cotton is extracted as powder, which can be used in multiple ways.

*It’s a closed loop! The water, heat and biodegradable green chemicals are used again and again – which means it generates no secondary pollution.

 

Monki has created the brand’s first collection using the Green Machine system. The online exclusive grey tracksuit set features the statement, respect your mother (nature), embroidered on the hoodie and trackpants. While this is a smaller scale production at the moment, the brand aims to roll out the process on a larger scale by autumn 2021.

Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki

“As a fashion brand we need to do our part when it comes to closing the loop. With eyes wide open Monki will walk into this climate-decade and be part of the solution.” Says Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki, “If we can prolong the life of our products for as long as possible and decrease usage of virgin sources, it’s a huge step in the right direction.”

 

The facts

The majority of the clothes we wear and produce today are made of cotton and polyester blend fabrics, and there is no commercial method available that can fully recycle these garments into new ones. Until now.

What: The Green Machine (hydrothermal technology).

Why: Time to change the game for textile recycling at scale.

Where: The collection was made together with Monki and one of the brand’s key suppliers in Indonesia.

How: The machine separates blend textiles by using only heat, water and less than 5% biodegradable green chemicals. See below for the full step-by-step process.

Who: In 2016, the H&M Foundation partnered up with the Hong Kong Research Institute of Textiles and Apparel (HKRITA), with a common goal to accelerate research on textile recycling. The goal was to find a commercial method that could recycle blend textiles at scale Only one year later, the researchers found a way to use a hydrothermal method to recycle blend textiles without any quality loss – and the Green Machine was born. Monki is the first brand to create and distribute garments from the Green Machine.

 

 

Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki

“Imagine a world where fashion brands implemented impactful and meaningful strategies through innovative design and production – and importantly, invite their community to be part of the journey, to re-use and recycle garments.” Says Jenny Fagerlin, Sustainability Director at Monki, “This is one milestone and key puzzle piece that we’re actively working on. We have big plans and are positively overwhelmed by the success of this partnership thus far.”

Erik Bang, Innovation Lead at H&M Foundation

“As a non-profit foundation we invest our resources in solving the most meaningful challenges around us. We act as catalysts for change and to achieve real impact we need solutions to be adopted and scaled by industry and citizens. That is why this collection is a milestone beyond just clothing, it is a meaningful milestone for the benefit of the planet, right here and now.” Says Erik Bang, Innovation Lead at H&M Foundation, “Next, we’re building a plant and will give this technology away for anyone to use. That is how we can exponentially accelerate the change needed to reach the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.”

 

Edwin Keh, CEO of HKRITA

"We are very excited to be able to scale the hydrothermal separation system with Monki, finally we have gone from concept to trials to products." Says Edwin Keh, CEO of HKRITA. "By making yarns, fibres, and apparel with the "Green Machine" we want to demonstrate that while fashion cycles maybe fast, the materials we use to make our clothes can last a long time."