Climate impact

Planet powerClose the loop › Climate impact

We aim to be climate positive

As a fashion brand, we are very much aware of the impact we have on the climate. From making sure that the chemicals we use in our factories are safe for both people and planet, and using less virgin materials (new materials and not recycled), to making sure our shipping is even more environmentally friendly. Monitoring our value chain at every stage can help us lessen our impact on the environment.

 

Value chain say what?

When we say value chain, we mean all the activities that are involved in bringing a product to life. From sketch and production, to transport and onto the shelves. It's also, about the activities that take a store from initial concept sketch to opening as well. So, to give you an idea of what's involved, we created these two journeys to explain things a little better.

 

Reducing our footprint

From production and the chemicals we need to make them. To logistics and the waste from packing. Here you can dig a little deeper into how we are working on lessening our environmental impact.

 

Did you know?

Sometimes there needs to be legal changes so that factories are able to install, for example, solar panels on the roofs of the factories. That's why H&M Group collaborates with governments and authorities, as a way to create positive changes beyond our industry.

 

From sketch to final product
Chemicals
Shipping
Waste

From sketch to final product

So, what's involved in making something sustainable? It's more than just choosing a 'good' material, it's being able to look at the entire value chain and making sure our impact, on people and the planet, is as low as possible. Oh, and when we say value chain, we mean all the things involved in bringing your new favourite Monki garment to you.

 

Design

It starts with the look, style, quality and choice of materials. Beyond the obvious, like what ends up on the cutting floor, these choices all have an effect on the environment and people across our value chain.

It’s also important for us to keep in mind what fibres we blend or don’t blend together. Because the fewer we blend the easier it is to recycle them.

 

Raw materials

Processing raw materials, like cotton, is one part of the value chain that is often associated with concerns for working conditions, water usage and chemical use. Which is why it's so important for us to chose wisely! Like Better Cotton or recycled polyester, more sustainable materials can help us significantly reduce our impact at this stage. Which is why our aim is that 100% of our raw materials should be recycled or sustainably sourced.

Read more about our material choices here.

  

Fabric and yarn production

Generally speaking, we do not have direct business relationships with mills who make our fabric and yarn. However, it's still super important for us and our value chain to work with them to improve their sustainability performance. It's also why the H&M Group, has one of the strictest Chemical Restrictions List in the industry.

 

Garment production

At Monki, we do not own any factories. Rather we work with independent suppliers. And yes, many of these are located in some of the world’s poorest countries. Garment production is often the first step on the way out of poverty for many, so we have a big responsibility here. Together with our suppliers, we work to improve social and environmental standards. Not just for the garment's footprint, but for better conditions for the workers making them. So achieving fair living wages, reducing overtime and ensuring workplace safety are all key focus areas. To do so, we work together with the H&M group and other organisations such as the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the Fair Wage Network and the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI). Read more about working conditions, wages and worker's safety here.

 

Transport

Did you know that 3% of the greenhouse gas emissions in a garment’s lifecycle comes from transportation. So being smart, like choosing ships and trains over planes to transport garments from supplies to warehouses, helps us reduce our footprint significantly.

 

Sales

We have over 120 stores across 19 markets – and we’re growing! Our stores and our warehouses, play a big roll in our value chain. For example, we use in our stores, offices and warehouses wherever this is credibly available and feasible. We re-use and recycle materials used for store fixtures and are always looking at how we can advertise smarter and more responsibly, both with materials in store and online.

 

Customers

Caring for the clothes, post purchase, represents about 13% of all of the greenhouse gas emissions in a garment’s life. This is why we want to inspire you to be conscious of the way you care for your clothes. Turns out, the lazier you are, the better 😉 For example, washing garments at 30°C instead of 60°C and line drying instead of using a tumbler, saves both money and energy. We're also big fans of repairing! Because DIY is fun — check out our Jeanious denim hacks for some inspiration.

 

Recycling

95% of all clothes that end up in landfill today could have been recycled. Creating new fibres is costly for the environment and generates waste. That doesn’t make sense. Not letting resources go to waste makes sense. That’s why we offer the opportunity to recycle in all our stores, together with our partner I:CO, and encourage you to make recycling a part of your visits to Monki.

Read more about our recycling initiative with I:CO

Chemicals

100% toxic-free by 2030

During the production of our garments and products, we do use some chemicals when washing, dyeing and printing. To make sure that we don't pollute our planet we have strict regulations in place. We aim to be 100% toxic-free by 2030.

 

Are all chemicals bad for the environment?

The simple answer is no, but this doesn't mean that all chemicals are harmless.

The fact is, chemicals are needed for many everyday things one might not think about. Like washing dishes, doing laundry or to produce items we use in our daily life. When it comes to our production, chemicals are used when we dye our products, creating printed fabrics and washing our materials. Since using chemicals is an essential part of producing our garments, it's crucial that we only use safe chemicals that don't cause harm for you and our planet. That's why we make sure to eliminate any hazardous discharge into water, soil and air.

In 2011, we signed a commitment to phase out hazardous chemicals within our textile supply chains by 2020. We also have sustainability commitment assessments that include a set of requirements concerning the safety of chemical handling and storage, as well as environmental requirements such as the treatment of wastewater and the handling of hazardous waste.

 

Always safe products

We work with Screened Chemistry which is a method that assures that we've chosen the best in class chemicals. It's a hazard-based method where a third-party assessment addresses any environmental and human health hazards. With this method, we aim to have 100% toxic-free fashion by 2030. Let’s break it down a little further – we've set a plan in motion that includes these aspects:

  • 100% Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals enrolment — meaning, there is no hazardous chemicals used in our supply chain.
  • Traceability of the input of chemicals used in all H&M Group production for commercial goods.
  • Policy engagement to push legislation and support public policies promoting progressive chemical management.
  • Share information with customers and work with a 'right to know' principle. Including full public disclosure of wastewater discharge test data.
  • We promote innovation and the development of better chemicals and technologies to enable the use of better chemicals in the supply chain.
  • Clean factories with restricted chemicals phased-out in the whole production site and, 100% Common Industry tools and standards.

Recycled Materials and Chemicals

Recycled materials are a key element in a circular future. However, increasing the use of recycled materials while staying toxic-free has its challenges. That's why we've started mapping textile waste streams and we're also assessing chemicals. This way, we can assure that hazardous substances are not allowed to re-enter the production cycle. (We define hazardous as persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction or endocrine disruption.)

 

Did you know?

  • H&M Group was one of the first in the industry to establish a Chemical Restrictions List. This was in 1995 and the list has been continuously updated since. All our suppliers are contractually bound to comply with the list.
  • H&M Group’s chemical requirements usually go further than existing regulations and together we can promote progressive chemical management. The overall strategy is that hazardous chemicals shouldn’t be used in production or be found in any of our products.
  • To ensure compliance with our Chemical Restrictions we perform regular tests on our products, mainly performed by third-party laboratories. In 2018, more than 48700 of such tests were conducted to ensure the safety of our products.

Restricted Substance List (pdf)

Shipping

After we have produced our garments we need to transport them to our warehouses, stores and eventually your doorstep. And it's interesting to know, that while it's a common misconception that the majority of emissions occur in connection with transport, it only attributes to around 3%.

Choo choo choosing a better alternative

Rather than planes, the H&M group, use trains and boats as far as possible to transport our products from factory to warehouses and stores. This helps to lower our climate impact and while the H&M group has a slightly lower emissions figure of 3%, rather than the industry average of 4%. Go, team!

Waste

Our aim is to recycle 100% of the waste collected in all our stores and 95% of waste originating or delivered to our distribution centres.

From design and production to packaging and store fixtures, we always aim to reuse or recycle any waste that we generate. This is an important step in reaching our goals, of becoming a fully circular fashion brand and climate positive.

 

Faulty products

One product going to waste, is one too many as far as we're concerned. Regardless if that's pre or post-purchase. Which is why we have a strict policy to prohibit the destruction of any products that could be sold, donated, used or recycled.

 

Sale to make room for new

Sometimes, unfortunately, we get excited over a design but you, our customer, don't. And that's okay, but this results in overstock. And that's why and when we put those garments on sale. Think of it like a closet cleanout to make room for new. While everyone loves a sale, it's not our goal. In fact, we put a lot of time and effort into accurately forecasting the demand for products. We see this as a really important (like HUGE) step in being able to reduce overstock. Something that naturally we want to avoid.

 

Returns

While it's rare, there are some instances when a return can not be sold, given to charity or recycled. For example, if it becomes mouldy during transportation. While we do our upmost to prevent this, worst case is we do need to destroy a garment. In this case, we prioritize incineration for energy recovery where possible.

The good news is, recycling technologies are advancing, so there is more and more opportunity to recycle.

 

Packaging

Who doesn't love the excitement of opening up an online shopping purchase? Here, your main focus is most definitely on the garment(s) unless you're a cat, in which case it's often the box. Which is why we’ve been busy to create a packaging platform that helps us lower our impact, with simple and sustainable paper packaging. This means no plastic bag and no excess tissue paper.

Good news for cats, it still arrives in a box... or packet, depending on the size.

Read more about our packaging.

 

Stores and distribution centers

Our aim is to recycle 100% of the waste collected in all our stores and 95% of waste originating or delivered to our DCs. The good news is, that this 'waste' is stuff like cardboard, plastic and paper, which can be easily recycled.

 

Production waste

It's important for us to work together with our suppliers to reduce waste. Which is why in 2018, as part of the H&M group, we started developing a strategy to help reduce, reuse and recycling waste within our supplier's factories.

  • We reuse and recycle product assortment including charity donations.
  • 100% of physical Monki stores have recycling systems.
  • We recycle waste originating at our DCs and waste delivered to our DCs from our stores.
  • In 2018, we launched the Sustainable Workplace Standard and plan to roll it out to all our offices, distribution centres and stores worldwide during 2019.

Climate impact

Planet powerClose the loop › Climate impact

We aim to be climate positive

As a fashion brand, we are very much aware of the impact we have on the climate. From making sure that the chemicals we use in our factories are safe for both people and planet, and using less virgin materials (new materials and not recycled), to making sure our shipping is even more environmentally friendly. Monitoring our value chain at every stage can help us lessen our impact on the environment.

 

Value chain say what?

When we say value chain, we mean all the activities that are involved in bringing a product to life. From sketch and production, to transport and onto the shelves. It's also, about the activities that take a store from initial concept sketch to opening as well. So, to give you an idea of what's involved, we created these two journeys to explain things a little better.

 

Reducing our footprint

From production and the chemicals we need to make them. To logistics and the waste from packing. Here you can dig a little deeper into how we are working on lessening our environmental impact.

 

Did you know?

Sometimes there needs to be legal changes so that factories are able to install, for example, solar panels on the roofs of the factories. That's why H&M Group collaborates with governments and authorities, as a way to create positive changes beyond our industry.

 

From sketch to final product
Chemicals
Shipping
Waste

From sketch to final product

So, what's involved in making something sustainable? It's more than just choosing a 'good' material, it's being able to look at the entire value chain and making sure our impact, on people and the planet, is as low as possible. Oh, and when we say value chain, we mean all the things involved in bringing your new favourite Monki garment to you.

 

Design

It starts with the look, style, quality and choice of materials. Beyond the obvious, like what ends up on the cutting floor, these choices all have an effect on the environment and people across our value chain.

It’s also important for us to keep in mind what fibres we blend or don’t blend together. Because the fewer we blend the easier it is to recycle them.

 

Raw materials

Processing raw materials, like cotton, is one part of the value chain that is often associated with concerns for working conditions, water usage and chemical use. Which is why it's so important for us to chose wisely! Like Better Cotton or recycled polyester, more sustainable materials can help us significantly reduce our impact at this stage. Which is why our aim is that 100% of our raw materials should be recycled or sustainably sourced.

Read more about our material choices here.

  

Fabric and yarn production

Generally speaking, we do not have direct business relationships with mills who make our fabric and yarn. However, it's still super important for us and our value chain to work with them to improve their sustainability performance. It's also why the H&M Group, has one of the strictest Chemical Restrictions List in the industry.

 

Garment production

At Monki, we do not own any factories. Rather we work with independent suppliers. And yes, many of these are located in some of the world’s poorest countries. Garment production is often the first step on the way out of poverty for many, so we have a big responsibility here. Together with our suppliers, we work to improve social and environmental standards. Not just for the garment's footprint, but for better conditions for the workers making them. So achieving fair living wages, reducing overtime and ensuring workplace safety are all key focus areas. To do so, we work together with the H&M group and other organisations such as the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the Fair Wage Network and the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI). Read more about working conditions, wages and worker's safety here.

 

Transport

Did you know that 3% of the greenhouse gas emissions in a garment’s lifecycle comes from transportation. So being smart, like choosing ships and trains over planes to transport garments from supplies to warehouses, helps us reduce our footprint significantly.

 

Sales

We have over 120 stores across 19 markets – and we’re growing! Our stores and our warehouses, play a big roll in our value chain. For example, we use in our stores, offices and warehouses wherever this is credibly available and feasible. We re-use and recycle materials used for store fixtures and are always looking at how we can advertise smarter and more responsibly, both with materials in store and online.

 

Customers

Caring for the clothes, post purchase, represents about 13% of all of the greenhouse gas emissions in a garment’s life. This is why we want to inspire you to be conscious of the way you care for your clothes. Turns out, the lazier you are, the better 😉 For example, washing garments at 30°C instead of 60°C and line drying instead of using a tumbler, saves both money and energy. We're also big fans of repairing! Because DIY is fun — check out our Jeanious denim hacks for some inspiration.

 

Recycling

95% of all clothes that end up in landfill today could have been recycled. Creating new fibres is costly for the environment and generates waste. That doesn’t make sense. Not letting resources go to waste makes sense. That’s why we offer the opportunity to recycle in all our stores, together with our partner I:CO, and encourage you to make recycling a part of your visits to Monki.

Read more about our recycling initiative with I:CO

Chemicals

100% toxic-free by 2030

During the production of our garments and products, we do use some chemicals when washing, dyeing and printing. To make sure that we don't pollute our planet we have strict regulations in place. We aim to be 100% toxic-free by 2030.

 

Are all chemicals bad for the environment?

The simple answer is no, but this doesn't mean that all chemicals are harmless.

The fact is, chemicals are needed for many everyday things one might not think about. Like washing dishes, doing laundry or to produce items we use in our daily life. When it comes to our production, chemicals are used when we dye our products, creating printed fabrics and washing our materials. Since using chemicals is an essential part of producing our garments, it's crucial that we only use safe chemicals that don't cause harm for you and our planet. That's why we make sure to eliminate any hazardous discharge into water, soil and air.

In 2011, we signed a commitment to phase out hazardous chemicals within our textile supply chains by 2020. We also have sustainability commitment assessments that include a set of requirements concerning the safety of chemical handling and storage, as well as environmental requirements such as the treatment of wastewater and the handling of hazardous waste.

 

Always safe products

We work with Screened Chemistry which is a method that assures that we've chosen the best in class chemicals. It's a hazard-based method where a third-party assessment addresses any environmental and human health hazards. With this method, we aim to have 100% toxic-free fashion by 2030. Let’s break it down a little further – we've set a plan in motion that includes these aspects:

  • 100% Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals enrolment — meaning, there is no hazardous chemicals used in our supply chain.
  • Traceability of the input of chemicals used in all H&M Group production for commercial goods.
  • Policy engagement to push legislation and support public policies promoting progressive chemical management.
  • Share information with customers and work with a 'right to know' principle. Including full public disclosure of wastewater discharge test data.
  • We promote innovation and the development of better chemicals and technologies to enable the use of better chemicals in the supply chain.
  • Clean factories with restricted chemicals phased-out in the whole production site and, 100% Common Industry tools and standards.

Recycled Materials and Chemicals

Recycled materials are a key element in a circular future. However, increasing the use of recycled materials while staying toxic-free has its challenges. That's why we've started mapping textile waste streams and we're also assessing chemicals. This way, we can assure that hazardous substances are not allowed to re-enter the production cycle. (We define hazardous as persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction or endocrine disruption.)

 

Did you know?

  • H&M Group was one of the first in the industry to establish a Chemical Restrictions List. This was in 1995 and the list has been continuously updated since. All our suppliers are contractually bound to comply with the list.
  • H&M Group’s chemical requirements usually go further than existing regulations and together we can promote progressive chemical management. The overall strategy is that hazardous chemicals shouldn’t be used in production or be found in any of our products.
  • To ensure compliance with our Chemical Restrictions we perform regular tests on our products, mainly performed by third-party laboratories. In 2018, more than 48700 of such tests were conducted to ensure the safety of our products.

Restricted Substance List (pdf)

Shipping

After we have produced our garments we need to transport them to our warehouses, stores and eventually your doorstep. And it's interesting to know, that while it's a common misconception that the majority of emissions occur in connection with transport, it only attributes to around 3%.

Choo choo choosing a better alternative

Rather than planes, the H&M group, use trains and boats as far as possible to transport our products from factory to warehouses and stores. This helps to lower our climate impact and while the H&M group has a slightly lower emissions figure of 3%, rather than the industry average of 4%. Go, team!

Waste

Our aim is to recycle 100% of the waste collected in all our stores and 95% of waste originating or delivered to our distribution centres.

From design and production to packaging and store fixtures, we always aim to reuse or recycle any waste that we generate. This is an important step in reaching our goals, of becoming a fully circular fashion brand and climate positive.

 

Faulty products

One product going to waste, is one too many as far as we're concerned. Regardless if that's pre or post-purchase. Which is why we have a strict policy to prohibit the destruction of any products that could be sold, donated, used or recycled.

 

Sale to make room for new

Sometimes, unfortunately, we get excited over a design but you, our customer, don't. And that's okay, but this results in overstock. And that's why and when we put those garments on sale. Think of it like a closet cleanout to make room for new. While everyone loves a sale, it's not our goal. In fact, we put a lot of time and effort into accurately forecasting the demand for products. We see this as a really important (like HUGE) step in being able to reduce overstock. Something that naturally we want to avoid.

 

Returns

While it's rare, there are some instances when a return can not be sold, given to charity or recycled. For example, if it becomes mouldy during transportation. While we do our upmost to prevent this, worst case is we do need to destroy a garment. In this case, we prioritize incineration for energy recovery where possible.

The good news is, recycling technologies are advancing, so there is more and more opportunity to recycle.

 

Packaging

Who doesn't love the excitement of opening up an online shopping purchase? Here, your main focus is most definitely on the garment(s) unless you're a cat, in which case it's often the box. Which is why we’ve been busy to create a packaging platform that helps us lower our impact, with simple and sustainable paper packaging. This means no plastic bag and no excess tissue paper.

Good news for cats, it still arrives in a box... or packet, depending on the size.

Read more about our packaging.

 

Stores and distribution centers

Our aim is to recycle 100% of the waste collected in all our stores and 95% of waste originating or delivered to our DCs. The good news is, that this 'waste' is stuff like cardboard, plastic and paper, which can be easily recycled.

 

Production waste

It's important for us to work together with our suppliers to reduce waste. Which is why in 2018, as part of the H&M group, we started developing a strategy to help reduce, reuse and recycling waste within our supplier's factories.

  • We reuse and recycle product assortment including charity donations.
  • 100% of physical Monki stores have recycling systems.
  • We recycle waste originating at our DCs and waste delivered to our DCs from our stores.
  • In 2018, we launched the Sustainable Workplace Standard and plan to roll it out to all our offices, distribution centres and stores worldwide during 2019.